Simplicity Interviews Former Simplicity Organizer and Author, Robin McCoy

How did you decide to become a professional organizer with Simplicity Organizers?

I’ve always been organized.  Bed made, notebook in order, permission slip signed… so helping others get organized seemed a natural extension.  A propensity for organization is something inborn- like eye or hair color.  But unlike physical characteristics which are fixed, we can get better at keeping our ducks in a row.  And I wanted to help others get better.  Changing homes can change lives.

Tell us a bit about how your experience as a professional organizer with Simplicity prompted you to write down Robin’s Rules of Order – Principles and practices for your best nest.

Working for Simplicity was a fantastic opportunity to hone my organizing skills.  It also gave me a great platform for teaching clients some of the tricks that work for me.  I decided that Rules was a better name than tricks.  Ironically, Rules liberate.  They give you guardrails for keeping your material world under control.  And once you know some Rules, on occasion, you can break them!

Who would you recommend hiring a professional organizer to?

A professional organizer can help in myriad circumstances.  A move, especially to smaller quarters is an obvious time.  A blended family (how many toasters or tvs do you really need) might benefit from professional help.  And for those who are staying put but are ready to clear out the clutter of things they no longer (or worse- never) used or loved, Simplicity can keep the project on time and on track.

How are your Rules and Simplicity Organizers connected?

Robin’s Rules and Simplicity Organizers are connected at the hip.  Rules provide the “why” and Simplicity provides the “how”. When you first consider why you have come to have so many things you do not use or love, it makes it much easier to deal with how to get them under control. The boxes, bins, trash bags and labeler are tools to employ after you’ve gotten a grip on the psychological and emotional components of stuff. Why before how for the best results!

My relationship with Simplicity is warm and collaborative.  They have been unfailingly supportive of my new venture and I am certain of the transformation Simplicity provides- changing homes and changing lives.  

You seem to practice what you preach so naturally. Has it always been easy to do?

There have been times in my life where I tended more toward excess than I do now. But never would you find my living space a mess.  My childhood bedroom, my school desk or book bag, my college dorm, rented apartments, hotel rooms, houses… I am uncomfortable if my space isn’t in order.  And I’ve found it easier to keep that order if I don’t have too much stuff. But I am not a minimalist.  I’m an “enoughist”.  That’s my word for the place where things are balanced between too little and too much.  My grandmother used to tell me, “Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.”  I love that mantra.  It is particularly satisfying when you are following it, not out of desperation or sheer necessity, but out of sheer desire to live more simply and thoughtfully.

We LOVE Robin’s Rules of Order. Tell us more about your latest book, Writings on Robin’s Rules – For your Nest, Refreshed.

I love that you love my books.  Writings on Robin’s Rules grew from a few random essays into a full fledged book.  Some early readers of Robin’s Rules of Order said their only complaint was that it was too short.  So I kept writing, under the guise of a blog. But those who know me know that a book suits me better than a blog and thus, the second book. It expands on the principles, philosophies and practices that were introduced in the first book.  In some essays the Rule is explicitly identified and sometimes more obliquely. But the Rules are the foundation for it all. And don’t be put off by the term essay. They are really just short, hopefully thought-provoking musings.

What one principle best defines and links Robin’s Rules and Simplicity?

Antoine de St. Exupéry’s belief:  “Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add but when there is nothing more to take away.” For both the why and the how of dealing with our things, it is the reductive process, not an additive one that makes things work.  When we identify the things we neither use nor love, and let them go, what’s left is perfection. And like beauty, perfection is in the eye of the beholder.  It’s your decision and your delight!

2 Responses to “Simplicity Interviews Former Simplicity Organizer and Author, Robin McCoy”

  1. Mary Powers

    Robin and Simplicity are inspiring! I too aspire to the simpler life – and the fullness that simplicity brings.

  2. Blair

    Wonderful to hear, Mary. Thank you for sharing!

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